Need rollers for Challenge 1528 KP

greetings all

I am new to the forum, and was hoping someone could help me track down form rollers for a challenge proof press. My rollers were thrown out by a janitor (i had them off of my press so i could do some brayering) and it’s been difficult to track any down.

i may need to have some new core’s fabricated, but don’t know where to start. any info would be most helpful!


thanks

everett

Need rollers for Challenge 1528 KP

11 thoughts on “Need rollers for Challenge 1528 KP

  • December 14, 2011 at 11:35 am
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    I have a 15 KA, and there are no gears on the form rollers. The form rollers turn when they are in contact with the oscillating roller.

    Rob

  • December 12, 2011 at 5:49 pm
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    thanks a ton yvon! i really appreciate it. i don’t know an awful lot about challenge presses…someone may have swapped the plate with the model number since it is not fastened on my press. i think the roller mechanism is the same. i am going off memory, so i think i imagined the gears on that side of the roller, but i have a feeling they work the same as the motorized version of the press. maybe i can go ahead and just have the roller cores machined and go from there!

  • December 12, 2011 at 3:58 pm
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    Everett, taking a look at your press photo above, I realize you have the ‘manual inking’ model, meaning your press is a 1528KA.
    I looked through the few PDF brochures I’ve found on Challenge presses, although none of them ever show clear photos or illustrations of the non-operator side of the presses well enough to clearly demonstrate the differences between powered and manual models, the one F-217 PARTS MANUAL for Series K presses breaks all the parts down in clear schematics.
    It appears that the roller configuration may be the same on both manual and powered models, but the non-operator end of at least one KA form roller must sport a gear as you describe.
    I would upload these PDF brochures for you all to benefit from, but the blog only allows me to upload JPGs. As Ralph suggested, let us share our resources, so anyone interested in adt’l literature on the K series Challenge presses can contact me off list at info@studiomadillo.com, I’ll gladly share them with you.
    Regards, Yvon

  • December 12, 2011 at 8:39 am
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    Of course, I should have thought of snapping a few pics while I was measuring. Here are 3 photos that show the press, rollers and gears quite well, they were supplied to me by the previous owner of the press just before I bought it some years back. Of course, the press is now somewhat cleaner than shown here.
    NOTE: on my press, there are no geared ends on either of the form rollers.
    Rather, the gears found on the distributor and rider rollers are what engage to the drive gear (just above the back form roller). The form rollers are themselves engaged once the distributor and rider are cantilevered over top of them.
    …I wanted to up 3 photos but this blog is only allowing one photo at a time? Paul, what feature am I missing, I know people have posted more than one image at a time. Perhaps my working with Firefox on the MAC brings about limitations in functionality?

  • December 9, 2011 at 1:25 pm
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    yes, thank you so much all for your replies! any chance someone can take photos of their form rollers? in particular, the gear side. i’m trying to explain to some people how the gear mechanism works on this press, but i can’t quite recall how it works (since i’m missing mine :( )

  • December 9, 2011 at 1:10 am
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    I just want to express that I find it very satisfying to read the very prompt, lengthy and helpful responses Everett got.
    Hopefully you’ll have new rollers soon!

  • December 8, 2011 at 11:02 pm
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    thanks a lot all!

    Yvon, i actually bought the press of the hicks brothers, so maybe he was reaching out on my behalf? i should circle back with them with these measurements to see what they can do…

    let me know whenever you get your measurements Ralph!

  • December 8, 2011 at 10:35 pm
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    Hello Everett,

    Were I not 600 miles away from my 1528KP, I would be glad to confirm roller specs from my press, serial number 2487. Looks like you have good information from Yvon Lantaigne, however.

    When I am able, I will be curious to record some measurements myself, to compare with what Yvon has provided.

    I hope you are successful with your efforts and would be very interested to hear what you find out.

    Seems to me it might be interesting for those of us who own a Challenge 1528KP to make contacts. We could perhaps help in parts searches, discuss operational/maintenance information, share photos, etc. I would also be interested in hearing how others rate their presses, experiences, likes and dislikes.

    Press On!
    Ralph Milner

  • December 8, 2011 at 8:35 pm
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    Everett, dimensions for you:

    Challenge 1528KP form rollers:
    – overall core length 22.0625″ (I found this an odd measurement, mine may have the ends ground down on a previous recovering job, they could easily be 22.125″, the ends are free wheeling in the form roller sockets

    Starting from ends:
    – first 1.440″ of core is .625″ diameter
    – next 1.62″ steps up to 1.000″ diameter
    – center section steps up to 1.750″ diameter

    Rubber recovered area:
    – starts flush with the start of the 1.75″ diameter portion and runs 16″ x 3″ diameter overall
    – roller surface actual length 15.125″, so 7/16″ of rubber tapering out to the 16″ measure (from each end.)

    While I was at it…

    Challenge 1528KP rider roller:
    – overall core length 19.8125″

    Starting from ends:
    – first 0.90″ of core is .625″ diameter
    – next portion steps up to 1.000″ diameter, runs for 1.36″ before rubber starts and appears to run clear through the middle section of the roller at the same diameter

    Rubber recovered area:
    – starts 2.25″ from the core ends and runs 15.25″ x 2.25″ diameter overall
    – roller surface actual length 14.8125″, so 11/32″ of rubber tapering out to the 15.25″ measure (from each end).

    NOTE:
    there are machined holes at the end of each core (possibly 1/8″ diameter), I ran of time and my lighting wasn’t optimum, so I couldn’t determine how deep these holes are, or if they are threaded (as Vandercook SP-15 cores are) or not.
    I’d venture to say that dead center holes in the ends of your cores would be desirable at the rubber recovering stage, although they would not serve any immediate purpose on the press itself, as best as I can determine.

    LAST NOTE:
    Norm at Hick’s Brothers reached out to me once wanting to borrow one of my 1528KP rollers to obtain core specs, he wanted to machine more cores for one (or perhaps more) of their presses, he may have actually gone ahead an machined spare sets? I’d reach out to him before undertaking getting new cores machined from scratch. They’re close to you in Fremont:
    http://www.printingequip.com/

    Let us know how you manage with these please.
    Yvon

  • December 8, 2011 at 4:54 pm
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    Everett, glad you found the forum.
    No spare cores I’m afraid, but I can get you overall dimensions next time I’m at my shop. Visually, I can tell you that the cores start at approx 1/2″ diameter and step up to 1.125″ for a bit, then comes the rubber recovered area, 15″ wide by 3″ diameter.
    I can tell you that Columbia Rubber in Portland, OR (www.columbiarubbermills.com) recovered a set of 15KP rollers for a friend just last year. To my knowledge, there is little difference between the 15KP and 1528KP models, in fact, I’m not sure they are not the same model press? If anyone reading this has good info on the various model Challenge presses, please share with us, there is very little material out there on these presses.
    At any rate, I’m pretty sure Columbia keeps all roller order specs on file, you may try reaching them, ask for Steve G.
    Back at you in a day or so.
    Cheers! Yvon

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