Moving a Vandercook 4

Hello folks,

Alright, I’ve hired a rigger to move my press out of its current location in Memphis & we’re trucking it down to New Orleans.

Can anyone advise me on something I can build to move the press from the truck, down the ramp, into the door, and into the front room? If I put two heavy duty wheels on four lengths of 2″ X 4″ I’m hoping that will be sufficient but I would love to hear if that’s a terrible idea. I’d love to avoid hiring a rigger all over again for what seems like a simple move & I’m afraid that a power jack isn’t long enough to get under it all and have it go through a standard doorway.

I’d love to hear that there’s a not over $200 solution out there.

Best,

Friedrich Kerksieck

Moving a Vandercook 4

6 thoughts on “Moving a Vandercook 4

  • September 30, 2013 at 6:23 pm
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    Hello,

    Thanks for the suggestions. Just wanted to say that we’re all moved in.

    Luckily a couple things came together – my landlord does renovations in the neighborhood & there was also a forklift and crane down the street working on building a new market. So I got hooked up with a moving crew and some powerful equipment for cheap. Did a couple runs on the Vandy today and all seems to be in good order.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Friedrich

  • September 24, 2013 at 9:09 pm
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    I don’t disagree with Eric. But have used the method described with and without a come-along on a few occasions. To use pipes Friedrich would first have to mount skids to the feet of his press. In a phone conversation I also suggested a come-along and he assured me that the incline was minimal.

  • September 24, 2013 at 9:31 am
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    Using wheeled dollies to move a Vandercook is exactly how I saw a man snap his leg in two, when the dolly shifted and the press fell onto his leg. NEVER move equipment without maintaining control at all times, and that may mean keeping lines to it by come-along, winch or pulley, by applying wedges or bars to retard motion, or other means. But to think you can wheel a press down an incline is asking for disaster.
    Pipe rollers are a better choice than wheels if only because the drop is less if there is trouble, and the travel is limited.

  • September 23, 2013 at 7:08 pm
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    Got it figured – thanks Paul.

  • September 23, 2013 at 6:57 pm
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    Thanks Paul.

    Any advise on where to pick up the load dollies? That’s basically what I was thinking about making, but that would be so much easier.

    Great advise on the end-to-end weight – will do.

    Hope we get to see each other more now that we’ll be nearer to being neighbors. Finding lots of great press folks in the city.

    Friedrich

  • September 23, 2013 at 6:44 pm
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    You can get by with a long crow bar, scrap 2 x 4s and fulcrum) two standard size 1000 lb load dolleys (one on each end)and a couple of muscly friends as spotters spot. Lift at the recess on the feet castings. But first:
    – remove top frame oscillator and bottom frame form rollers.
    – Roll the carriage to the end of the bed and secure it with ratcheting straps. This balances the weight end-to-end when the press is on a ramp.
    – Remove the hand crank (loosen set screw and tap out taper pin.

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